Archive for the 'Asian cuisine' Category

The Cantonese care deeply about the freshness of their produce and seafood. Fuchsia Dunlop takes us through an open-air Hong Kong market to show us the live seafood and fresh produce that play a key role in Cantonese cuisine. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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For adventurous palates, Hong Kong is one of the most rewarding destinations on earth. Here, a diner finds the best of Cantonese cuisine as well as expert renditions of regional cooking from all over the mainland. To supply all these discriminating cooks, Hong Kong’s food merchants scramble to locate ingredients beyond compare. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Da Ming Fu Restaurant of Beijing, specializes in house-made tofu. K. F. Seetoh explains the various dishes and flavors made by the restaurant’s chef. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The chefs at Beijing’s Da Ming Fu restaurant demonstrate how to make sweet-and-sour whole fish using an amazing frying technique. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Restaurants in Beijing maintain the tradition of the Mongolian hot pot, the communal meal centered on a cauldron of simmering broth. Diners choose among many different ingredients for dipping. Dong Lai Shun is a hotpot specialist with 150 locations across China. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Dong Xing Shun is famed for another specialty too: the traditional stuffed sweets made by hand by the elderly proprietor. The desserts are made with a dough of glutinous rice flour then stuffed with a mix of hawthorn, sesame and sugar. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Even Beijing residents who can afford luxury maintain a soft spot for humble fare, such as tripe and other innards. Most Chinese diners appreciate chewy texture more than Westerners do, so tripe may be cooked in a way that preserves that quality. At Dong Xing Shun, near the waterfront, we will sample tripe as the locals like it. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Surely Peking duck ranks as one of the masterpieces of Chinese cooking, a dish as renowned for its succulence as for its artful presentation. At Da Dong restaurant in Beijing, cooks spend years mastering this craft, which involves preparation of the ducks for roasting, total command of the oven, and superb slicing technique. In a fine-dining establishment such as Da Dong, the duck will be carved into no fewer than 100 thin pieces. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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K. F. Seetoh takes us on a tour of the dishes of Beijing’s Yue Shen Zhai Restaurant, including beef flavored with star-anise that shows the region’s Muslim culinary influences. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The food served at Beijing’s Yue Shen Zhai Restaurant today is probably very close to what the emperors might have eaten. A Yue Shen Zhai chef shows us how to make a simmered beef dish with a mix of spices that demonstrates the area’s Muslim influences. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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China’s last emperor abdicated in 1912, but one can still eat like an emperor in Beijing, capital of the People’s Republic. With his guide K. F. Seetoh, we visit a 250-year-old restaurant whose founders had the rare privilege of delivering meals to the Forbidden City. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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From the world-renowned Peking duck, with its crackling skin, to the simple pleasures of silken tofu made by hand, Beijing offers culinary travelers a trail of adventures. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Yu Bo’s restaurant is a triumph of imagination and skill. Chef Yo Bo and his assistants demonstrate some of the creative dishes he serves at his world renowned restaurant. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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No visit to the Sichuan region would be complete without experiencing a formal banquet. Yu Bo is one of China’s most talented culinarians. He serves a parade of little dishes—many rich in symbolism and presented in elegant serving pieces—leaving no doubt that the Sichuan table ranks among the world’s most sophisticated. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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One of the most popular dining rituals of Sichuan, the hot pot, is a meal that brings friends together for hours of relaxed chatting, sipping and dipping. In this lively atmosphere, diners enjoy a number of flavors and textures by adding beef tripe, mutton, shrimp and fish balls, lettuce and lotus roots, and tofu skins to their bubbling hot pot. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Chengdu’s teahouses are where locals can spend a relaxing few hours in conversation while playing mah jong and enjoying lid bowl tea. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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To sample a variety of traditional street snacks in Chengdu, such as dumplings and noodles, head for Jin Li Street where many vendors sell their specialties side by side. Fuchsia Dunlop takes us on an insider’s tour one afternoon and introduces us to some of her favorites. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Anyone hoping to understand the range of Sichuan cooking should plan to dine at a Buddhist monastery restaurant. In these establishments, monks prepare elaborate vegetarian fare, much of it designed to mimic Sichuan classics like twice-fried pork. The Baoguang Temple in Xindu serves a meatless lunch of artful dishes that fool the eye and offer more proof of the Sichuan penchant for healthful eating. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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At Hong Xing Restaurant, Fuchsia Dunlop samples a soup prized for its health-promoting, qualities. For Sichuanese people, food and medicine are eternally intertwined. Many foods stimulate the system or provide equilibrium, and some are thought to be powerfully therapeutic. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Fuchsia Dunlop shows us other Sichuan classics at a neighborhood restaurant called Weiyuan. Here they will encounter the use of fish-fragrant sauce, a hallmark of the Sichuan table. Healthful and fresh seasonal vegetables play a substantial role in the meal. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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