Archive for the 'Asian cuisine' Category

In this video, Brett Lynch, corporate executive chef for the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, prepares Alaska Black Cod in Acacia Honey Marinade. The combination of sweet honey, salty and umami-rich soy sauce, and tart vinegar in this marinade brings out the luxuriously rich and buttery texture of the black cod. The internal temperature of the fish should reach about 140°F when done. In place of pea leaves, you can also pair the black cod with wilted spinach and seared shitake mushrooms. Black cod is also called sablefish and butterfish, and Alaska is home to the world’s largest wild black cod fishery. The fish are sustainably harvested from late February to mid November, but also available frozen year-round.

Recipe at: http://ciaprochef.com/alaskaseafood/recipe11/

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Won ton soup is so familiar to American diners that they may pass it over when visiting Hong Kong. Big mistake. At Mak’s Noodles, a local favorite, the won ton noodle soup is simply flawless. Fuchsia Dunlop visits with Mak himself to learn what makes his soup stand out, and she also discovers the best time of day to try it. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The area of Hong Kong known as Kowloon is one of the most densely populated locations on earth, with a seemingly endless supply of places to snack when hunger strikes. Roberta, our street food guide, shows us some of her favorite street vendors and snack shops in Kowloon, including a tea shop where health-promoting turtle jelly is on the menu. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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For more insight into Cantonese cooking techniques, Fuchsia Dunlop visits the kitchens of One Harbor Road, a fine-dining restaurant in the Hyatt Hong Kong hotel. Here they receive a private cooking class with the hotel’s world-class chefs: How to expertly steam a whole fish. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Part two of our Dim Sum meal with Fuchsia Dunlop at Hong Kong’s Victoria City restaurant. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Fuchsia Dunlop takes us to a more formal dim sum experience. For that occasion, she chose Victoria City, where diners make their selections from a menu instead of from rolling carts. Her commentary should make you a more enlightened dim sum customer. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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For a look at how many Hong Kong residents start their day, Fuchsia Dunlop shows us a popular breakfast spot of long standing. No sign of cappuccino and croissants here. The patrons of the historical Lin Heung restaurant break their fast with strong tea and dim sum. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The Cantonese care deeply about the freshness of their produce and seafood. Fuchsia Dunlop takes us through an open-air Hong Kong market to show us the live seafood and fresh produce that play a key role in Cantonese cuisine. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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For adventurous palates, Hong Kong is one of the most rewarding destinations on earth. Here, a diner finds the best of Cantonese cuisine as well as expert renditions of regional cooking from all over the mainland. To supply all these discriminating cooks, Hong Kong’s food merchants scramble to locate ingredients beyond compare. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Da Ming Fu Restaurant of Beijing, specializes in house-made tofu. K. F. Seetoh explains the various dishes and flavors made by the restaurant’s chef. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The chefs at Beijing’s Da Ming Fu restaurant demonstrate how to make sweet-and-sour whole fish using an amazing frying technique. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Restaurants in Beijing maintain the tradition of the Mongolian hot pot, the communal meal centered on a cauldron of simmering broth. Diners choose among many different ingredients for dipping. Dong Lai Shun is a hotpot specialist with 150 locations across China. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Dong Xing Shun is famed for another specialty too: the traditional stuffed sweets made by hand by the elderly proprietor. The desserts are made with a dough of glutinous rice flour then stuffed with a mix of hawthorn, sesame and sugar. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Even Beijing residents who can afford luxury maintain a soft spot for humble fare, such as tripe and other innards. Most Chinese diners appreciate chewy texture more than Westerners do, so tripe may be cooked in a way that preserves that quality. At Dong Xing Shun, near the waterfront, we will sample tripe as the locals like it. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Surely Peking duck ranks as one of the masterpieces of Chinese cooking, a dish as renowned for its succulence as for its artful presentation. At Da Dong restaurant in Beijing, cooks spend years mastering this craft, which involves preparation of the ducks for roasting, total command of the oven, and superb slicing technique. In a fine-dining establishment such as Da Dong, the duck will be carved into no fewer than 100 thin pieces. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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K. F. Seetoh takes us on a tour of the dishes of Beijing’s Yue Shen Zhai Restaurant, including beef flavored with star-anise that shows the region’s Muslim culinary influences. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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The food served at Beijing’s Yue Shen Zhai Restaurant today is probably very close to what the emperors might have eaten. A Yue Shen Zhai chef shows us how to make a simmered beef dish with a mix of spices that demonstrates the area’s Muslim influences. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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China’s last emperor abdicated in 1912, but one can still eat like an emperor in Beijing, capital of the People’s Republic. With his guide K. F. Seetoh, we visit a 250-year-old restaurant whose founders had the rare privilege of delivering meals to the Forbidden City. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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From the world-renowned Peking duck, with its crackling skin, to the simple pleasures of silken tofu made by hand, Beijing offers culinary travelers a trail of adventures. For recipes, visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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Yu Bo’s restaurant is a triumph of imagination and skill. Chef Yo Bo and his assistants demonstrate some of the creative dishes he serves at his world renowned restaurant. For recipes and more videos visit www.ciaprochef.com/WCA6

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